Frequently Asked Questions

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zy'-mo-glyph'-ic, adj. [Gr. zyme leaven + Gr. glyphe carving] 
1. Of, or pertaining to, images of fermentation, specifically the solid residue of creative fermentation on natural objects
2. The collection and arrangement of objects, primarily either natural or weathered by natural forces, for poetic effect

Q: Do you allow photography?
A:
Yes, in fact photography is encouraged. The museum maintains a special page for selected photographs taken by visitors.

Q: Is any of this for sale?
A:
As with any museum, the collections and exhibits are not for sale, but there is a museum shop! You can purchase prints, books, and souvenir merchandise.

Q: Hey, I've got a whole garage full of weird stuff! Maybe I should start my own museum! Any tips??
A:
Yes! The museum staff has compiled a handy booklet for patrons in just your situation! You can download it here (PDF). Should your museum develop an online presence, please inform the museum staff and you can be added to our list of affiliated institutions.

Q: How long have you been doing this?
A:
A long time. The museum itself was constructed just in time for new millenium. For the full answer, see here.

Q: How did you find such a perfect word to describe your stuff?
A:
I made it up.

Q: What about those snails that do the "assemblage art"? Did you make those up too?
A:
No.

Q: Do you know about the Museum of Jurassic Technology?
A:
Yes. There is similarity in using the museum as a means of creative expression, although the theme there is making you wonder what is real and what is not, whereas my theme is making something extraordinary out of detritus and discards. The Xenophora exhibit is probably the closest thing to the spirit of the MJT.

Q: Do you show other people's works in the museum or just your own?
A:
For the Zymoglyphic galleries, it is just me (unless you count those snails as people). The museum's Curiosity Cabinet shows a selection of objects in the museum's collections that other people have made, as well as natural curiosities.

Q: Do you get your ideas from dreams?
A:
No. I just put stuff together and see what happens. Sometimes I have dreams about a terrarium with some primordial ooze in it that is actually alive. Other times I will dream about art works that, in the dream, other people have made. I think, "Wow! I wish I had thought of that!". Which, of course, I did.